Circle City Village Status Update

Circle City Village

Square One Villages in Eugene, OR has put together a 10-step road-map for building a tiny house village that is illustrated in the image below. Some people think building “tiny houses for the homeless” is as simple as building a tiny house and moving someone in. It takes much more than that, though, to make a successful environment for someone to have a chance to transition from experiencing homelessness to a stable life in housing.

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Many people have told us that steps 3 and 4 can be the most time-consuming steps in the process. Our experience has shown this to be true. Building political will goes beyond getting city politicians on-board. It really gets down to working through the neighborhood political landscape. People can be excited about the idea of a tiny house village for those transitioning out of homelessness until they consider the possibility of putting the village in…

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What Can A Tiny House Do?

Circle City Village

Post from one of our team members, T J Curtis.

What can a tiny house community do to help end homelessness?

When you’re first learning to ride a bike if you keep your eyes on where you are and not in front of you, you will often crash it’s only when you keep your eyes on where you’re going that you succeed. So what can a tiny house community do?

It provides a stable home; providing the security of belongings and the security of knowing where your gonna lay your head every night.

As our friends experiencing homelessness are out there in camps, sleeping on downtown streets, benches and pretty much wherever they can living life like this forces you to constantly keep your eyes on where you are. It robs you of any hope of where you’re going because it often changes nightly where you end up.

What a…

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Tiny Houses and the New Sidewalk Sitting Proposal

Circle City Village

When we began exploring the possibility of building a tiny house village in Indianapolis, one of the first people I contacted was Susie Cordi, the City-County Councillor for my district. She helped set up a meeting with another Councillor in her party. On the day of the of the meeting, we were joined by another Councillor from the other party who happened to be at the same coffee shop. This meeting started a good relationship with these and other members of the City-County Council who expressed support for our plan.

I was disappointed on Friday to see that Councillor Cordi is now one of the primary sponsors of a new proposal being introduced at the September 24 meeting of the Council that would prevent people from sitting or lying on city streets or sidewalks in downtown Indianapolis between 6 a.m. and midnight. The proponents of this bill say that part…

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Among You As One Who Serves: Guest Post (sort of) by Troy Cady

Last month, my friend, Troy Cady, came from Chicago to share with our Diakonos Community Simple Church Gathering. Before he left on his trip to Indy, he posted some thoughts on his upcoming trip in light of some of the discussion going on that week about leadership and the Global Leadership Summit at Willow Creek …

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Why “Random Acts of Kindness” Aren’t Always Kind

This is a picture my friend, Angela Hopson, took will doing outreach among friends experiencing homelessness this week. It shows an area at one encampment where boxes of perishable and non-perishable food is just dumped for people in the camp to use. For those of us who work regularly with friends experiencing homelessness, we need …

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Transformational, not Transactional

The last Wednesday of June, I participated in the Warp and Woof podcast with Dr. Mark Eckle and Dr. Clyde Posley. The topic of discussion for this program was Transformational Relationships. We discussed the need to walk with a person long enough to see sustainable change in their life instead of just providing quick goods and …

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Thoughts on the Future

It’s been ten years since I wrote this and it seems more relevant than ever. The “three small children” are now in middle school and high school. They recognize what the world they were born into is like. Thankfully, they have a good perspective on it and desire to make positive changes as much as they are able to.

As I was at a prayer meeting at one of the churches near here tonight I spent some time reflecting on the future for our society. The prayer guide that we were using started with a time of prayer for our leaders, both political and spiritual.

I’m not typically a doom and gloom prophetic type of person, but I could not help but think that we may be on the brink of a catastrophe in our culture. I’ve often had this feeling that we are overdue for a collapse. It’s not just the easy to identify sins of sexual immorality, drugs, abortion, and violence that lead me to this conclusion. We’ve also created an environment of self-centeredness, greed, and materialism. These are much more subtle traps and someday we will have to give an account as a people for what we have done with our many blessings.

This is a…

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Allowing Others To Count The Cost

I'm sitting here this morning thinking over the passage we will be reading at the Diakonos Community Simple Church Gathering tomorrow morning. Our theme for the day is "We Die With Christ." I'm particularly struck by these two illustrations presented by Jesus: "Don’t begin until you count the cost. For who would begin construction of …

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